Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Folly – A Review




Disclaimer: A copy of this book was provided by Tundra Publishing for review. The opinions expressed here are honest and are in no way influenced by the publishers or the author.

Synopsis via Amazon.ca

A love story, a social history, and an act that echoes through generations.

Set in the late 1800's, Marthe Jocelyn's stunning new novel is told in the voices of four people whose lives and destinies intertwine. There's Mary, who begins "exceeding ignorant" (apart from what a girl can learn from family mayhem, a dead mother, and a grim stepmother) and winds up encountering lust and betrayal when she becomes a servant in a fine house in London. Mary's nemesis is another maid in the household, Eliza. Eliza also knows lust and betrayal, but she doesn't know who is betraying who.

Mary's and Eliza's actions will intersect with a foundling home in London, where Oliver is a teacher who tries to avoid feeling anything that will perhaps make him live a real life. And then there's the foundling boy, James. Who will he grow up to be if he doesn't know where he comes from?

In the chaotic way of every life, where the past, present, and future collide, Marthe Jocelyn has traced a story that is heartbreaking and unforgettable.

My Review
Have you read Folly yet? If not then you have no idea that you are missing out on.  This historical fiction by Marthe Jocelyn has all the elements of a great story; a strong cast of characters, great story line and plot that is not to obvious and the story is really well paced. But more importantly, it has a real message behind the story. By the time you get into this book, you would not want this story to end.

Folly is about a young woman Mary, who leaves her comfort zone in the country side to work in London. The move is orchestrated by her 'evil step mother'. Her new position in the Allyn house brings not only a new opportunity for her but it also brings jealously, intrigue and love. For those of us who judge a book by its cover, the front cover of this book doesn’t accurately prepare you for the story that you are about to read. It’s the first paragraph in the book that grips you and sets up the tone for the remainder of the book.

Jocelyn uses four point-of-views to help tell the story of Mary and James. These characters live in different time periods ie Mary (1878) and James (1888). I thought it was a great idea to not only get the perspective of the two main characters but to also get the perspective of other people who are closely related to the story. Without even knowing it, those four points-of-view is what ultimately builds the story.

It is evident that Marthe‘s book belongs in the young adult genre. There are many issues in the story that would resonate well with that age bracket.  Jocelyn is also really good at tapping into the emotions of teens and young adults no matter what period in time they live in. I guess you can call folly a great coming of age story as well since in the beginning, Mary’s tone starts off as a teenager but ends as an adult.  Somehow, Jocelyn’s writing allows Mary to mature right in front of your eyes. You especially notice it in her tone coming to the end of the book. I think that adults will also appreciate this story since Mary grapples with very adult issues. You cannot help but feel for Mary in her situation.

Speaking of the lead character, I really really liked her and I wished all women could be like her. Mary is funny, witting and so headstrong. She stands up for what she believes in even if that appears to be going against the established status quo in nineteenth century England. James on the other hand is so youthful, brave and extremely smart. It was a joy to get to know him.

This is a light, funny story with real issues and Jocelyn is a great author who, even though she remains relatively unknown, should be on everyone’s reading list.

FYI
You can check out Marthe Jocelyn's website for more information about her books

1 comment:

Diane said...

Scary cover art on this one...LOL

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
Copyright 2011 Bookventures Book Blog. All Rights Reserved. Powered by Blogger.